School-based HPV vaccination campaign wraps up

Published in Breaking News
Friday, 31 October 2014 12:40

350 000 grade 4 girls 9 years and older received the first injection of this two-dose vaccine in March and April this yearAs a school campaign to inoculate girls against one of the leading causes of cervical cancer wraps in the Northern Cape’s Siyancuma Local Municipality, one nurse says parents need to know more about the human papillomavirus (HPV).

 

As a school campaign to inoculate girls against one of the leading causes of cervical cancer wraps in the Northern Cape’s Siyancuma Local Municipality, one nurse says parents need to know more about the human papillomavirus (HPV).

 

This month, grade 4 girls lined up for their second vaccination against HPV that will protect them from developing cervical cancer later in life. About 350 000 grade 4 girls 9 years and older received the first injection of this two-dose vaccine in March and April this year, according to the National Department of Health.

 

The campaign recently concluded in Douglas, Northern Cape in the province’s Siyancuma Local Municipality. Sister Mitzi Prinz helped lead the Douglas leg of the campaign and says awareness – and community buy-in – could be improved.

 

“Not everyone in our municipality had been informed regarding this campaign and that’s why not all parents and guardians gave permission for girls to be vaccinated,” said Prinz, who added that the vaccination programme was carried out in about 14 schools.

A lack of awareness is despite door-to-door efforts by local community health care workers to inform guardians about the benefits of the jab for young girls.

 

“We still have a long way to go but we’ll get there,” said Prinz, who also encouraged women who are sexually active to go for regular Pap smears.

 

In the public health sector, HIV negative women only get three free Pap smears starting at the age of 30, while HIV positive women are allowed more screenings because they are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer.

 

This article is courtesy of Health-e News Service.

Smokers and single men at higher risk for oral HPV

Published in Breaking News
Wednesday, 10 July 2013 09:51

Smokers and single men are more likely to acquire cancer-causing oral human papillomavirus (HPV), according to new research published in The Lancet.

 

HPV infection is known to cause virtually all cervical cancers, most anal cancers and some genital cancers. It has recently been established as a cause of the majority of oropharyngeal cancers, a malignancy of the tonsils and base of tongue.

 

HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer is rare, but rates have been increasing rapidly, especially among men. To determine the pattern of HPV acquisition and persistence in the oral region, researchers evaluated the HPV infection status in oral mouthwash samples collected as part of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study, which was originally designed to evaluate the natural history of genital HPV infections in healthy men.

 

“Some types of HPV, such as HPV16, are known to cause cancer at multiple places in the body, including the oral cavity,” said study lead author Christine M. Pierce Campbell, a postdoctoral fellow in Moffitt’s Centre for Infection Research in Cancer in the United States. “We know that HPV infection is associated with oropharyngeal cancer, but we don’t know how the virus progresses from initial infection to cancer in the oral cavity. One aspect of the HIM Study is to gather data to help us understand the natural history of these infections.”

 

During the first 12 months, nearly 4.5 percent of men in the study acquired an oral HPV infection. Less than one percent of men in the study had an HPV16 infection, the most commonly acquired type, and less than two percent had a cancer-causing type of oral HPV.

 

Their findings are consistent with previous studies showing a low prevalence of oral HPV cancers. However, this study shows the acquisition of cancer-causing oral HPV appeared greater among smokers and unmarried men.

 

“Additional HPV natural history studies are needed to better inform the development of infection-related prevention efforts,” said Anna R. Giuliano, director of Moffitt’s Centre for Infection Research in Cancer. “HPV16 is associated with the rapid increase in incidence of oropharyngeal cancer, most noticeably in the United States, Sweden and Australia, where it is responsible for more than 50 percent of cases. Unfortunately, there are no proven methods to prevent or detect these cancers at an early stage.”

 

The researchers note that persistent oral HPV16 infection may be a precursor to oropharyngeal cancer, similar to how persistent cervical HPV infection leads to cervical pre-cancer.

 

Source: EurekAlert!

 

Article courtesy of Health-e News Service.

 

 

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